Ryoji Ikeda, Transfinite: A Film by Forma Arts and Media


Ryoji Ikeda, Transfinite: A Film by Forma Arts and Media

A short film that discusses Ryoji Ikeda’s 2011 installation “The Transfinite”, an immersive visual and sonic installation at the Park Avenue Armory, and it’s unique impact.

via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog http://www.faithistorment.com/2013/04/ryoji-ikeda-transfinite-film-by-forma.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FaithIsTorment+%28faith+is+torment%29

Faces: Paintings by Jan Esmann

Faces: Paintings by Jan Esmann

Hyper-realistic portrait paintings of individuals in some sort of dream state.

Contemporary art, especially painting, has turned towards a renewed interest in the craft of figurative art. Contemporary art is of course no longer modernist art, but postmodernist art, and as such a renewed interest in the lost craft of figurative painting, that modernism killed off, is only natural, though it is also a very elitist trend within otherwise self-conceited postmodernism.

via Faith is Torment | Art and Design Blog http://www.faithistorment.com/2013/04/faces-paintings-by-jan-esmann.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FaithIsTorment+%28faith+is+torment%29

Forget data transparency: options grow for letting you hide your data

There’s no doubt it’s a data driven world. But increasing concerns about companies’ collection and uses of personal internet user data have given rise to a few solutions.

One is a personal data locker where users would be able to store their own information and grant companies limited access, rather than abide by companies’ privacy policies. Some people have even talked about compelling companies to disclose the data they keep on consumers, even though it might be hard to understand and use.

But others are simply opting out of the data revolution.

Stopping tracking in its tracks

One CEO has in mind an approach that comes from the opposite direction. Rather than ask companies to disclose more, Bill Kerrigan, the chief executive of Abine, believes internet surfers should avoid letting companies detect their activity in the first place; or at least try to limit the amount of new data companies can gather to tie with existing information about end users.

Abine introduced its browser extension for blocking online tracking in February 2012. The DoNotTrackMe extension is free, although the company charges for another service: the (temporary) removal of information from popular online data collectors such as Spokeo and ZabaSearch. And later this year, Kerrigan said, Abine will release a service for consumers to get proxy email addresses and phone numbers for plugging into websites that demand that information.

Besides Abine’s DoNotTrackMe feature, there are other options for preventing tracking. Free privacy and security software from AVG includes the option, for example. There’s also PrivacyChoice’s free Privacyfix web application, which displays the sites that have installed cookies on a computer for tracking activity and the data being shared through Facebook, Google and LinkedIn. Internet Explorer 10 was released last year with the do-not-track option in place by default, putting Microsoft on the side of privacy advocates, not advertisers.

The trouble is, if companies can’t see consumer demographics or preferences, websites might not be able to delight customers with responsive features. For example, without location information, Google Now would be considerably less powerful. At a recent event in San Francisco, Hilary Mason, the chief scientist at bit.ly, raved about Google Now. “For the first time (a product) takes everything (Google) knows about me and actually gives me something I want,” she said.

Similarly, at GigaOM’s Structure:Data conference in New York last month, executives at other companies that require location and other personal information from users agreed that users are willing to sacrifice personal information if they like what they can get in return.

Bringing data back

Andreas Weigend, former chief scientist at Amazon.com and now a consultant and Stanford University lecturer, is in the habit of asking executives what they could do to impress their customers by using data. He also tends to raise the question of how much data, if any, companies should share with its customers.

For example, should an airline grant access to a recording of his or her most recent phone call to the airline? He raised the question to David Cush, president and CEO of Virgin America, at a 2011 conference on big data. (A video shows what happened; fast forward to 5:40.)

The problem with pushing for data disclosure on a large scale is it will take a lot of pushing from consumer groups, and opt-in from one company at a time could take many years. Legislation might not be ideal, either, as people could just go to different countries if they don’t like the policies governments set in place.

For now, both data ownership and data masking have drawbacks. But give this some time. As more companies dream up more ways to target consumers, and consumers become more weary of being tracked and targeted, better solutions to the privacy problem are likely to pop up in response.

Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:
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via GigaOM http://gigaom.com/2013/04/13/forget-data-transparency-options-grow-for-letting-you-hide-your-data/

Forget RSS. Nextly Is The New Way To Consume Online Content

With the demise of Google Reader, we’ve been on a constant mission of trying to find a better way to consume content online. There have been a few options that are something of an anti-RSS reader – they serve the same purpose of an RSS reader, but do so in a very different way. Joining the ranks of these ‘anti-RSS readers’ like Flipboard, Zite and Prismatic, is Nextly.

Nextly makes it possible to consume content from Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, and a variety of major news outlets, websites and more. The site places a ton of content at your fingertips, in an elegant and user-friendly interface. Nextly brings something of a TV channel experience to your web-browsing. You can switch between channels (or streams) based on the source or the topic, and simply skip from one article to the next.

After logging in either with Twitter or Facebook (which you have to do in order to sign up for a Nextly account), you’ll instantly be presented with your social media feed, available in a slick easy to navigate interface. There are two main ways to navigate your Nextly account. A bar at the top of the page features the original tweets or Facebook posts, while the article linked in those posts will be displayed in its original layout directly beneath that bar.

A  menu on the left hand side of the page gives you access to your main social media streams – including your Facebook feed, your Twitter feed and your Twitter lists. These are all listed under your ‘Favourite streams’. The next section available from the menu is your ‘Bookmarks’ – in other words links that you save within Nextly itself. And lastly, as far as content is concerned, you have a tab to explore other streams available through Nextly. This section gives you access to a variety of sources, divided by topical categories: news, tech, humour, gossip and more. It also includes a Reddit stream featuring 12 popular sub-reddits.

You can save or bookmark individual links which will then be accessible from the menu on the left, or you can share them via Facebook, Twitter or email.

Nextly makes it easy to navigate quickly from one article to the next using the arrow keys on your keyboard – a much appreciated feature since keyboard shortcuts are often a handy way of powering through a lot of content.

But that’s not the only thing we like about Nextly. When trying to handle the information overload coming in from social networks, websites, and our RSS readers, Nextly does a great job of making that abundance of content manageable. For starters – it can be a one-stop shop for a ton of different kinds of content coming from different places. Not only does it bring together two popular social networks by giving you access to your Facebook and Twitter streams, it also has the added benefit of bringing in content from popular websites from around the Web. Including Reddit as a category on its own was definitely a smart move on Nextly’s part as well.

That said, there are a few features we wouldn’t mind seeing added to Nextly. While we appreciate the fact that it’s incredibly easy to dive into a ton of different sources that have been chosen for us (and in that sense make it easy to discover new and interesting sources) – it would be great to be able to add websites of our choice to our stream. There may be sites I’m interested in following, but don’t necessarily keep up with them through Twitter or Facebook. Without that option, it becomes hard to choose Nextly in favour of other anti-RSS readers like Flipboard, for example.

Another way that Nextly can really come in handy is simply using it as a way to harness the power of Twitter lists. We’ve already taken an in-depth look at how Twitter lists could serve as a Google Reader alternative, and Nextly is a service that plays right into that concept. By instantly displaying the article as your scrolling through the tweets, you can tell at a glance if it’s something you’re interested in reading, you can save it for later, or you can read it and share immediately – all from within Nextly.

The sharing feature is another essential ingredient to making Nextly the ultimate way to consumer information, since not only can you power through the content, you can also decide to share it with your friends and followers on the spot.

What do you think of Nextly? Is it a viable alternative to Google Reader? Let us know in the comments.

The post Forget RSS. Nextly Is The New Way To Consume Online Content appeared first on MakeUseOf.

via MakeUseOf http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/forget-rss-nextly-is-the-new-way-to-consume-online-content/

Facebook Home hasn’t failed, it’s just getting started.

att-htc-first-android-facebook.jpg

As expected when something interesting is released, the posts begin to roll in about how it’s a failure. We’ve already got a ton of articles with titles like “steer clear of Facebook Home”, “Facebook Home suffering from poor Google Play reviews” and in traditional Forbes fashion “Why The Facebook Phone Will Fail and Why It Really Doesn’t Matter.”

I sometimes wish the media wasn’t so quick to jump to conclusions. Yes, historically a Facebook phone hasn’t panned out well. Yes, Microsoft apparently thinks they already did that. The thing about all of this is that none of these people are the target market.

If we look at this from the perspective of the Android community then yes, Facebook Home is a stupid idea because it dumbs down Android. But, for everyone else out there that doesn’t care about tinkering with their phone it’s perfect. There’s nothing to it, just scroll through your feed and interact or send a text. You’ve got the capability to install Android applications if you want and that’s a bonus, but the two big parts of many potential buyer’s life is front and center.

Those potential buyers? Teenagers. Young adults. The Facebook generation that is stuck interacting 24/7. They’re sharing as soon as they wake up and go to sleep. This market doesn’t like making phone calls. One of the biggest criticisms of Facebook Home is that it makes other apps hard to reach. I agree, but the teenagers I know really only use Facebook and SMS anyway.

Facebook Home isn’t targeted at those who go and manually download it from the Play Store. The application has bad reviews because it’s never It’s not destined for any member of the Android community or even those who currently use a smartphone. It’s targeted at a new generation of young people who don’t actually use their phone as a phone anymore. It’s intended as a preinstalled experience that some will intentionally seek to buy.

Instead of declaring Facebook Home “dead” by our standards, let’s wait to see how the HTC First does in the market. That’ll speak much louder than existing Android users.

A $99 phone that does 100% of what teenagers need is better for parents who might have otherwise been buying them an iPhone.

via Svbtle Featured http://owened.co.nz/facebook-home-hasnt-failed-its-actually-genius?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+svbtle+%28Svbtle+Featured%29

「なので」の接続詞用法

最近、「なので」を文頭に置き、接続詞として使う用法をよく見かけるようになった。調べてみると、Q&Aサイトなどにこの話題が出ていた。

教えて!goo – 「なので」の使い方に違和感を感じます。(2005/09/13)
http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/1646201.html

<最近、テレビなどで若い人が「なので」という言葉をよく使うように思います。
意味としては「だから」その丁寧語の「ですから」と同じだと思うのですが、私の感覚では「なので」は文章の頭にはつかないものです。
「雨なので自転車でなくバスで来た」という使い方をしませんか?
「雨が降っていました。なので自転車でなくバスで来ました。」という感じの使い方をとても頻繁に耳にするような気がします>。

Yahoo!知恵袋 – 先生に、「なので」は話し言葉的接続詞だとレポートのコメントに書かれました。(2009/5/23)
http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1026482115

<先生に、「なので」は話し言葉的接続詞だとレポートのコメントに書かれました。
話し言葉的接続詞と書き言葉的接続詞の違いを教えてください>。

発言小町 – 接続詞で「なので」って正しいですか?(2010年11月12日)
http://komachi.yomiuri.co.jp/t/2010/1112/363299.htm

<小学6年生の娘が
「全校集会で発表する原稿を暗記したから
間違ってないか聞いて」
というので、原稿を目で追いながら聞いていました>。

<途中で
「私は~だと思います。なので~~する方がいいと思いました」
という文章が出てきたので
「なのでってのはおかしくない?」
と言うと
「おかしくない、みんな使ってる」
と言われました>。

この3つの質問のうち、最初のものは2005年なので、この「なので」の用法は、おそらく10年くらい前にはすでにあったようだ。

回答を総合すると、文法的には間違いだが、口語的用法としてはかなり使われている、といったところ。

テレビ局のサイトで、この「なので」の用法を解説しているものがあった。

テレビ朝日 アナウンサーズ – 「なので」の正しい使い方 Reported by 田原浩史
http://www.tv-asahi.co.jp/announcer/nihongo/labo/lab_012/body.html

<最近視聴者の方からアナウンサーの言葉遣いについてのご意見が多く寄せられています。その中に、気になるご指摘があるので取り上げました>。

<それは、「~なので」のという言葉の使い方です。本来は文の途中で理由などを説明するときに使います。しかし、その「なので」を文の途中ではなく、文頭に使用するケースが非常に多く見受けられ、アナウンサーの言葉遣いとしては、とても違和感があります。
視聴者の方も同様に感じているようです。ご意見を沢山いただきました>。

<例)
「こんどみんなで食事に行くけど、一緒にどう?」
「そうですねえ。私最近とても忙しいんです。なので、ちょっと予定が立てにくいんです」>

<本来「なので」は断定の助動詞「だ」の連体形「な」+理由や原因を表す接続助詞「ので」によって構成されるため、他の言葉と結びつく言葉なのです。独立した接続詞でありません。ですから、文頭に「なので」を用いて文章を始めるのは、文法的に間違いです>。

テレビ朝日では、文頭の「なので」は文法的に間違いだ、と多くのアナウンサーが認識しているようだ。しかし、実際には多く使われていて、視聴者から意見がたくさん来ているとのこと。

NHK放送文化研究所 – 最近の若い人のことば(2009.02.01)
http://www.nhk.or.jp/bunken/summary/kotoba/uraomote/099.html

<接続詞で気になるのは、「なので」を文頭接続詞として使う例が多く見られます。
「私はファストフード店でアルバイトをしています。なので、人と話すのは平気です。」「私は小さいころから走るのが速かったです。なので、陸上部に入りました。」
などという使い方です>。

<こういうように文頭接続詞として使われると、60代以上の人の中には「なんかおかしいぞ」と思うかたがいらっしゃるようです>。

<たしかに、最近よく聞きますし、筆者も抵抗感を持ちます。そこで辞書を見ると、三省堂国語辞典は用例として「準備万端整った。なので心配していない。」を載せています。接続詞として。「前を受け、そうであるから、だから」という説明です。
『新明解国語辞典』も、2番目の意味として接続詞で扱い、「前に述べたことと、それを原因・理由として導かれる帰結とを結びつけることを表す。『外で食事は済ませてきた。なので、今は何も欲しくない』」とかなり詳しく記述しています。
ほかの辞書を見ると項目として「なので」を項目にしているものは少なく、『広辞苑』は掲載がありません。『大辞林』は、連語として扱い、接続詞としては認めていません。
古くは、形容動詞になり得る名詞に「な」と「ので」という助辞が付いたと解することが主流でした。
平成14年以降の辞書には接続詞として認めるものが出てきたようです>。

この解説は詳しい。最近の辞書では、この「なので」の用法をのせているものもあるようだ。

これらをぜんぶまとめると、文頭の「なので」は文法的には間違いだが、それ以外にうまい言い方がないので、広まっているということのようだ。「だから」だとちょっとニュアンスが強すぎるし、かといって、「よって」や「したがって」では、話し言葉では使いにくい。「なので」がいちばん自然だ、ということのようだ。

関連エントリ:
「重版出来」は「じゅうはんでき」?
http://mojix.org/2013/03/22/juuhan-deki
「真逆(まぎゃく)」は日本語の進化か、退化か
http://mojix.org/2012/09/10/magyaku

via モジログ http://mojix.org/2013/04/14/nanode